Gemini constellation Zodiac Paper cut Birthday or Greetings Card for the stargazer, astronomer or horoscope reader in your life.

$6.00

Only 1 left in stock

Description

This paper cut card brings you the constellation of Gemini, the different magnitudes of the stars represented by differing shapes and sizes.

Gemini – May 22 – Jun 21

The constellation contains 85 stars visible to observation on Earth without a telescope.

α Gem (Castor): the second brightest in the constellation after Pollux. Castor is a sextuple star system 52 light-years from Earth, which appears as a magnitude 1.6 blue-white star to the unaided eye.

β Gem (Pollux): the brightest star in Gemini, it is an orange-hued giant star of magnitude 1.2, 34 light-years from Earth. Pollux has an extrasolar planet revolving around it, as do two other stars in Gemini, HD 50554, and HD 59686.

γ Gem (Alhena): a blue-white hued star of magnitude 1.9, 105 light-years from earth.

δ Gem (Wasat): a long-period binary star 59 light-years from Earth. The primary is a white star of magnitude 3.5, and the secondary is an orange dwarf star of magnitude 8.2. The period is over 1000 years; it is divisible in medium amateur telescopes

ε Gem (Mebsuta): a double star, the primary is a yellow supergiant of magnitude 3.1, 900 light-years from Earth. The optical companion, of magnitude 9.2, is visible in binoculars and small telescopes.
ζ Gem (Mekbuda): a double star, the primary is a Cepheid variable star with a period of 10.2 days; its minimum magnitude is 4.2 and its maximum magnitude is 3.6.

η Gem: a binary star with a variable component. 350 light-years away, it has a period of 500 years and is only divisible in large amateur telescopes. The primary is a semi-regular red giant with a period of 233 days; its minimum magnitude is 3.9 and its maximum magnitude is 3.1. The secondary is of magnitude 6

κ Gem: a binary star 143 light-years from Earth. The primary is a yellow giant of magnitude 3.6; the secondary is of magnitude 8. The two are only divisible in larger amateur instruments because of the discrepancy in brightness.

ν Gem: a double star divisible in binoculars and small amateur telescopes. The primary is a blue giant of magnitude 4.1, 500 light-years from Earth, and the secondary is of magnitude 8.

38 Gem: a binary star divisible in small amateur telescopes, 91 light-years from Earth. The primary is a white star of magnitude 4.8 and the secondary is a yellow star of magnitude 7.8.
U Gem: a dwarf nova type cataclysmic variable discovered by J.R. Hind in 1855.

It is cut in a matte midnight blue 65lb card with a contrasting opalescent liner which glistens in the light. It measures 7″ wide by 5″ high.

It comes with a neutral envelope and is protected with a snugly fitting clear bag to keep your card safe and clean…

Reviews

There are no reviews yet.

Only logged in customers who have purchased this product may leave a review.

%d bloggers like this: